Author Archive | Jackie

Reuse, recycle, repurpose

ideaDo you write blog posts?

If yes, it might be a good time to double-check why, and make them work harder for you.

One of the criteria Google uses to rank websites is freshness, so regular blog posts are a good way to nudge your way up the search engine rankings.

They can also be optimised as landing pages for SEO or AdWords. Once readers are on your site, they might be persuaded to buy from you.

Most importantly, blog posts are great for demonstrating expertise and adding value for site visitors.

But it doesn’t need to stop there.

Every article you write can be used in a multitude of ways. Here are some (mostly) free ways of leveraging your blog posts.

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Death of the Apple fan girl?

AppleI’ve been an Apple user since the moment they were invented – but I’m increasingly concerned that they are no longer fit for purpose.

I currently have a iMac, an iPad and an iPhone. I love the way they seamlessly connect together, and I use at least one of them every day. I also have an old MacBook (the white one – remember those?) I’m currently editing my new book on that, to keep it separate from my day job.

As you probably know, Apple products are the norm within the creative sector. We love the simplicity, and the shiny logo. Mac products are so beautifully designed that we don’t care they cost more than the equivalent functionality of a PC or Android device.

But we do know the rest of the world hasn’t taken to Apple as much as we creatives. So we adapt. We (literally) buy adapters. We use different versions of common software, and don’t complain (much) when things don’t perform quite as they should.

Until recently, I’ve managed to find a workaround for everything I’ve needed to do. But technology is beginning to defeat me. Here are some examples:

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Having a funny five minutes

I was asked to do a five-minute talk recently.

“Great”, I thought. “I can practice my stand-up comedy skills.” (I’ve only done one stand-up performance before).

Then I discovered it was a Petcha Kutcha style talk. Turns out that it’s a Japanese phrase meaning ‘chit chat’ and is pronounced pCha kCha.

It’s a rigid discipline.

It meant using 20 slides (I hadn’t planned to use any) that automatically advance after 15 seconds each (traditional PK is 20 seconds). That means a maximum of 45 words per slide at a normal speaking rate of 3 words per second. That’s about 3 or 4 sentences. Not allowing for breathing, pauses or laughter.

I usually allow about one hour of preparation for each minute of speaking.

For this talk, it was at least double that. I workshopped the content with three or four people to polish it. They all added immeasurable improvements that I would never have achieved on my own. (Thank you Julie, Janice, Mitch and Fripp for your insights).

You might wonder how it went.

It wasn’t perfect. But it was far better than I expected.

I got amazing feedback (people laughed loads, told me it was brilliant, highlight of the night, and more of a performance than a speech).

Phew!

Watch it below: Why your job ads don’t work

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