Archive | Writing Without Waffle

Which ad do you notice first?

Have a look at this noticeboard (as seen in my local supermarket). Which ad jumps out at you most?

Noticeboard

You might be interested to find out whether your answer is the same as other people. Here are the results from when I asked this question on Facebook:

  • 27 CAP money / green pig (top left)
  • 11 Helper
  • 3 Yellow (bottom centre)
  • 2 Post-its / Looking after / red circle
  • 1 Recovery course

This article explores what’s going on here.

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How to brief your copywriter

TypewriterGood copy will reflect the unique tone of voice of your brand, while standing out from the competition and triggering your target customers to respond.

Good copy should win you business.

Bad copy will almost certainly help you lose it.

But copywriters are not magicians.

The quality of work you get from your copywriter will depend on the quality of the brief you give them.

The more work you put into preparing a good brief, the sooner you’ll get a result you’re happy with.

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Writing on a ‘need to know’ basis

Heathrow Departure LoungeSome websites try to tell everybody everything. However, there is no point in doing this, because your website is a step in a process. 

Site visitors have done something before they landed there – maybe they clicked on an ad, perhaps they typed your web address from your business card, or they found your site on a Google search. 

And you want them to do something after visiting your site, whether that is clicking a ’buy now’ button, phoning to make an appointment, or giving you their email address so you can keep in touch with them.

[As an aside, lead generation is increasingly difficult because all our inboxes are full to overflowing, and so are theirs. So you have to offer a really tempting incentive for someone to relinquish their precious contact details. And make sure it’s GDPR-compliant.]

Your website therefore needs to acknowledge where they are at, and then make their next step really obvious and simple.

You don’t need to tell them every single thing that will happen next. You only need to tell them the one thing they need to know at each point.

Think about it like this.

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Are you writing from the right point of view?

This is a diagram I often draw in training courses (the photo is me speaking at a Success Matters event in St Albans earlier this month).

Top down v bottom up

The stick figure at the top of my drawing is you.

The stick figure at the bottom is your reader.

You have a message you want to get into the brain of your audience.

The problem is that they already have something in their brain. They are thinking: “What’s In It For Me?”

Chances are that your message includes the words ‘I’, ‘Us,’ We’ or ‘Our’.

But the only words that answer the question in the mind of your reader are the words ‘You’ and ‘Your’.

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Why you need to find the feather

FeatherYou’ve probably heard of the butterfly effect also known as chaos theory? It posits that a small trigger can have a large impact, such as a butterfly flapping its wings and causing a tornado a few weeks later.

In behavioural science, there’s a theory known as nudge. Rather than forcing people to take the action you want them to take, it suggests that the best way to influence people is to nudge them in the direction you want them to go.

In an advertising book by Max Sutherland from, I think, the 1980s, he describes the secret of effective marketing as being like a feather on a seesaw. It’s another similar idea.

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Packaging. Wackaging. A little rant.

I don’t know about you, but these days, I struggle to open a bottle of milk.

Under the screwtop lid, today’s plastic milk bottles have a plastic/foil seal. You need immense strength in your fingertips to peel it, pinch it, and pull it away. Ideally, without spilling the milk (and crying).

I have no idea how old people manage it.

I’m not *that* old. Well, OK, I’m a *bit* old. After decades of typing, I admit my fingers probably don’t have the power they used to.

Also, I can’t open a yoghurt pot or soup carton without it splashing all over my hands and the kitchen worktop. Can you? If yes, please share the technique, because I simply don’t have it.

What’s more, I need scissors to cut open a bag of peanuts (I can’t tear the corner easily, even when it’s supposedly perforated). I also need scissors to get a new toothbrush or lip salve out of its packaging. And – as we all know – when you buy a new pair of scissors, you need a pair of scissors to cut open the plastic case they are encased in.

In this environmentally conscious age, single-use plastic has become a scourge. I look forward to the day when products are once again wrapped in, say, old newspaper. And when dairy products are served in refillable glass containers.

Oh dear, I sound like an old person.

Anyway, this leads into a topic I was asked to write about recently… what’s become known as ‘wackaging’. That is, wacky packaging.

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Reuse, recycle, repurpose

ideaDo you write blog posts?

If yes, it might be a good time to double-check why, and make them work harder for you.

One of the criteria Google uses to rank websites is freshness, so regular blog posts are a good way to nudge your way up the search engine rankings.

They can also be optimised as landing pages for SEO or AdWords. Once readers are on your site, they might be persuaded to buy from you.

Most importantly, blog posts are great for demonstrating expertise and adding value for site visitors.

But it doesn’t need to stop there.

Every article you write can be used in a multitude of ways. Here are some (mostly) free ways of leveraging your blog posts.

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Death of the Apple fan girl?

AppleI’ve been an Apple user since the moment they were invented – but I’m increasingly concerned that they are no longer fit for purpose.

I currently have a iMac, an iPad and an iPhone. I love the way they seamlessly connect together, and I use at least one of them every day. I also have an old MacBook (the white one – remember those?) I’m currently editing my new book on that, to keep it separate from my day job.

As you probably know, Apple products are the norm within the creative sector. We love the simplicity, and the shiny logo. Mac products are so beautifully designed that we don’t care they cost more than the equivalent functionality of a PC or Android device.

But we do know the rest of the world hasn’t taken to Apple as much as we creatives. So we adapt. We (literally) buy adapters. We use different versions of common software, and don’t complain (much) when things don’t perform quite as they should.

Until recently, I’ve managed to find a workaround for everything I’ve needed to do. But technology is beginning to defeat me. Here are some examples:

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